Replica designer My service to check whether an item is counterfeit or not target online

ByElle Pop

Replica designer My service to check whether an item is counterfeit or not target online

My service to check whether an item is counterfeit or not Counterfeiting is becoming a real problem in Magic The Gathering. Just this past week I received a counterfeit card in an order from a reputable business. Once you start buying expensive MTG cards you need to know how to spot a counterfeit in order to protect yourself. Luckily with MTG cards the printing process is the same with cheap cards and expensive cards so you can easily compare the cards for differences. Whatever can be replicated and is worth $200+ will be replicated IMO> I’m wondering how “counterfeit aware” payment processors (VISA, Mastercards, etc) are becoming?A bit more! They trust our Certificate with less pushback these days, more than 2 years ago, when we discovered our Certificate can get people money back. Everything happens on a bootleg website, partially because breeding and getting good stats is extremely time consuming, but also because the IRL scene is geared towards kids. I bought some proxies to use in different EDH decks. At that rate it’s pretty close to the rate you’d get if you bought a standard booster pack. If you trying to imply counterfeiting doesn actually affect gameplay, top hermes replica counterfeit cards are not tournament legal. Just play kitchen table magic with your friends.” In that case sure, but still don use counterfeit cards. “Proxy” cards are when a player prints out (or even hand scribbles on paper) the image of the “real” card they want to use. No one is scammed out of money. It doesn cost anymore than a sheet of printer paper and some ink. And because the card is obviously not official, there no confusion as to it authenticity. Well, I not claiming they are all ethical (although many are); I said that transparency provides leverage to demand improvement, and I double down on that by pointing out that real improvement has occurred through exactly these means in sectors from the rag trade to consumer electronics. Pleas for for everyone to be less materialistic have never moved the needle one iota, but an appeal to ethics is a superficial measure that nevertheless has systemic consequences. I wasn’t able to find a way to your customer experience workflow the first time I read the article (which is odd you have some words that seemed to clearly be intended to be links to it, but they were dead to me). Second time, I just went to your footer to your holding company, and was able to figure out the actual product from the list there. I didn’t download it though. I also figured out that some of your links ARE live, just not the ones I expected, and will take me to the app. Managing people from those backgrounds to get what you want is also a challenge for most execution founders. You may not be aware of the business models of the people who build large audiences or how to leverage them, of the influencer or advertising markets and tools for instance. I think you have some opportunity if you get someone clever who specializes in it. This thread is obviously helping you, and I never cry over the past. This was from within Engineering as an Engineer and later senior Eng leadership. I’d be curious what you learn if you go through the 7 Steps to a Successful Startup ebook. Just bought the book! https: to read it.> I don’t really use Twitter, but I’ll put it on my list to reach out in a couple weeks and see if any of this was helpful. Too much in my own bubble with that notion then The notes is a field in any e commerce store, where you (the store) can send the customer a messageThink: “your order has been shipped”But we write it manually “your item is authentic because X and Y” that our order note. And at the same time our serviceWhat I tried to do with the title was show the scrappiness. Maybe even inspire some hackers to be scrappy or to look for something other than perfection firstBecause if you pitching to a VC that you starting an authentication company for luxury itemsAnd you claim that you use the WooCommerce notes section, you be laughed out of the room. And not like the Airbnb founders without that second part of the story where you prove them wrong Hmm, okay. Too much in my own bubble with that notion then The notes is a field in any e commerce store, where you (the store) can send the customer a messageThink: “your order has been shipped”But we write it manually “your item is authentic because X and Y” that our order note. And at the same time our serviceWhat I tried to do with the title was show the scrappiness. Maybe even inspire some hackers to be scrappy or to look for something other than perfection firstBecause if you pitching to a VC that you starting an authentication company for luxury itemsAnd you claim that you use the WooCommerce notes section, you be laughed out of the room. And not like the Airbnb founders without that second part of the story where you prove them wrong Hmm, okay. Too much in my own bubble with that notion thenThe notes is a field in any e commerce store, where you (the store) can send the customer a messageThink: “your order has been shipped”But we write it manually “your item is authentic because X and Y” that our order note. And at the same time our serviceWhat I tried to do with the title was show the scrappiness. Maybe even inspire some hackers to be scrappy or to look for something other than perfection firstBecause if you pitching to a VC that you starting an authentication company for luxury itemsAnd you claim that you use the WooCommerce notes section, you be laughed out of the room. And not like the Airbnb founders without that second part of the story where you prove them wrong My understanding is that some of the “fakes” for high end fashion are due to multiple factories building products to the same specifications, but only the first one to deliver them gets paid. The others are still built to the exact same specification, and are functionally identical except for the logo. Is my understanding correct, and does your service distinguish between “fake because it isn officially blessed” and “fake because it uses inferior construction”?I tend to see the following categories overall, and while I not at all interested in the label side of things, I have a difficult time identifying well constructed or poorly constructed household items. Real label, high quality. Good to have, but much more expensive than I can usually justify. Real label, low quality. Typically when a brand has just been bought out, and is trying to cash in on a reputation while using cheaper construction. Fake label, low quality. Trash, masquerading as a good deal. Fake label, high quality. The absolute sweet spot, getting the higher quality build without needing to pay for the social “authenticity” of the brand label. It more like this: A company contracts with a factory, they want 100,000 pair of shoes. The factory however is going to make a million or keep making it until there no one to buy it. These are called “ghost shift” goods which is the bulk of counterfeits. If the product is not a limited run and still being produced the quality will be exactly the same. The factory makes a million items, and the QC workers will go through and pick out the best 100,000. The other 900,000 will be sold in the the developing world. The brand will typically take the 100,000 then send them to the US or Europe to another factory where they will have tags sewn in them and possibly some more labels or insignia attached. Particularly at stores like TJ Maxx, Bealls, and Ross et al. You can find these clothes and they will have a tag sewn into that has a lot number. What happens when a buyer disputes a counterfeit item with their “message” and the seller doesn agree? It may be easy to differentiate with counterfeit shoes, but what happens with art pieces, books, collectors items in general?(My experience: I collect Harry Potter books. Signed copies were always faked, because it is “easy” to forge a signature. But lately I been seen fake first printings. Some people buy 2nd or 3rd printings (way cheaper) and change the page with the bibliographical details, which is hard to spot. Those folks don run cheap. Very often, you need specialists in each domain. I thought of the academic world so as to prove the expertise (I the complete opposite of an academic) We write public guides (see: https: we have about 1m words written on the subject People are free to contest it. If we wrong, we correct The more other people link to our guides, the more we get. credentials, I guess?> you can have a fashion purse expert determining whether an “antique” firearm (where forgery is a big problem)We don really get that far, into firearms and the such. authenticated a pair of $20,000 Jordans: https: mostly B2C, so it a consumer focuseed service> But I guess if it really just sending links to Amazon listingsThe products we authenticating are mostly products so items that are $300+, most of the time sold out, have some resale value over retail OR retain more of their retail value than usual items (think: Chanel items) There is a great deal of information already available in their main lines of business with items of high volume, popularity, and resell value. A great example of all three would be the original set of collaborative releases between Nike and Off White, called “The Ten.” Many people have bought authentic pairs, and many, quite a few knowingly, have bought fakes. There is a large pool of information on the variability of both authentic and fake items. My guess is that what they have done, since it can be difficult to be an expert on everything. The bulk of their business probably also has to do with a small subset of the full market. I doubt they see many requests to authenticate, say, a pair of Carol Christian Poell drip sneakers, because they are low in volume and overall popularity. There is a fuzzy threshold for quality that is determined by the ability to identify these differences while someone is wearing the fake item. Let’s say the Nike sneakers or the Louis Vuitton bag mentioned. I would gather as many pictures of the known, proven knock offs as I could. Then I would find official images published by Nike and Louis Vuitton. Publish the guides to gain credibility and then participate in various forums where those products are discussed. When it hits a certain volume, offer priority service, etc. If you hit a wall where you’re not sure if the Rolex is real or not, there are two options. If Rolex is amenable to this, send the images to Rolex and ask them if there are obvious signs of a fake. Then you’re just playing the middleman and if Rolex needs more photos to authenticate, relay that back to the customer. If they’re not, I’m sure it’s not too difficult to locate someone who you know has a Rolex. Same thing for jewelries, watches, shoes, etc. Sneaker counterfeiters generally don care all that much about pass authentication checks. For shoes, and most clothing, they care more about time to market (getting their fake out before or near release date) and price point. If someone is wearing fake shoes, unless they outlandishly fake (there were some hot pink fake yeezys I seen more than one), you mostly likely won be able to spot these imperfections from a distance. Also, unless you in the niche you probably won care if they real or fake. There is a spectrum of replica quality in the watch world. Some watches are very obvious to spot while others would be impossible to spot from a photo. There is also the concept of a frankenwatch: a watch that is a blend of original and non original parts. Assuming the builder has done their research and due diligence with part selection, you would likely not be able to identify a frankenwatch from an original if they were sitting right in front of you. For example, many models of Rolex have “service” parts that differ from the parts originally used in the model. Pricing general follows the hierarchy: original parts > oem service parts > non oem replacement parts. The pricing gap between each of those steps can be in the tens of thousands. So if eBay authenticates a Rolex as original and you later on find out it has some non oem replacement parts, you’ve likely lost a significant amount of money on that transaction. Nothing that complicated. Is an expert time really worth so little that this price point is profitable? Or is authentication really that trivial to do?You only track revenue and net revenue and not profit. You are getting around $200k in revenue per year. Why should your users trust that you aren another one of those companies?You claim expertise in 91 brands. In order to truly be able to authenticate those, it seems like it would require a good amount of expertise and time. You claim:> Real expertise, not self claimed.> Find out the truth about your item and either start wearing it proudly or we’ll help you get your money back. Being good at something and getting noticed for talking about something a lot are different skill sets. Why should your users believe you have real expertise in all 91 of those brands? Some very good questions in this post that I would have also liked OP to answer. For context, I run a marketplace (https: where we physically verify every product transacted on our platform. We are focussing on Phones and similar high value electronic products susceptible to fraud. And visual inspection is definitely not enough to detect fakes in this industry. Also, average cost of having external experts is more than $20. So, there is a need for deep tech and a great supply chain to make the unit economics work.

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